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How To Cope With Vision Loss

Smiling Optometrist low vision eye exam 640×350A wide range of factors can lead to vision loss and the speed at which your vision deteriorates. For certain patients, changes to vision can occur quickly, as a result of eye diseases like untreated retinal detachment, wet macular degeneration or eye trauma. In other cases, vision loss is often very gradual, developing over many years and even decades, as in the case of open-angle glaucoma and dry macular degeneration.

Adjusting to visual impairment takes time and patience—but you don’t have to go through it alone. We can help. Below, we offer some tips to help you or a loved one with any degree of vision loss live a more fulfilling, independent and enjoyable life.

 

1. Visit a Low Vision Optometrist

Low vision optometrists are experienced in working with people who have low vision. They offer a low vision evaluation to determine how much vision you have and assess which tasks are giving you trouble. They will then prescribe low vision glasses and devices to allow you to do what you want to do.

2. Give your eyes a break

Eye fatigue is a very real and common side effect of vision loss. Many sight-threatening eye diseases cause symptoms like reduced color contrast, color and shape distortion, and light and glare sensitivity, among others.

All of these symptoms put a great deal of stress on the visual system since your brain works overtime to try and make sense of the distorted images your eyes are sending.

Make sure that your eyes are getting the rest they need by closing them for a few minutes at a time throughout your day, especially during visually taxing activities. Many patients also find it helpful to take power naps when possible.

3. Don’t be afraid to ask for help

Although it may be hard at first, asking for help from family, friends and even strangers may be necessary at any stage of vision loss.

We understand that asking for assistance may feel uncomfortable, but truth is—most people are happy to offer a helping hand.

4. Try slowing down

Moving at the same pace you once did can be dangerous after vision loss sets in. Give yourself the extra time you need to complete tasks, both routine and unfamiliar ones.

For example, if you’ve dropped an object, bend down slowly and cautiously to avoid accidentally bumping your head into something along the way.

5. Keep things [organized]

If it feels like you’re spending too much time trying to locate objects around the house, you may need a better organization system.

Keeping things in a set place will save time and energy. It also fosters independence and [minimizes] daily stress.

Using bold-colored labels, puffy paint, stickers, pins, and filing systems can all help keep objects neat and easily accessible.

Customize your [organizational] system to suit your needs — and stick to it. It will take some getting used to at first, but will ultimately be worth the effort.

6. Start relying on your other senses

Using your other senses like touch and hearing can be incredibly helpful when trying to get things done.

Using your hearing to detect an oncoming vehicle at a crosswalk will help you better navigate the road. Or using your hands to scan a surface when looking for your phone or keys can be more effective than trying to spot them visually.

Whether you’ve been living with low vision for a while or have received a recent diagnosis, we can help. At Low Vision of New Jersey, we understand the challenges that accompany low vision and make it our mission to improve the lives of our patients so they can live a more independent life.

If you or a loved one has experienced any degree of vision loss, call Low Vision of New Jersey today to schedule your low vision consultation.

Low Vision of New Jersey serves patients from The State of New Jersey, The Greater Philadelphia Area, North Howell, Philadelphia, and throughout New Jersey.

 

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Errol Rummel

Q: #1: What is low vision?

  • A: People with low vision can achieve no better than 20/70 vision, even with glasses, contact lenses, or surgery. Low vision is typically caused by eye injuries and eye diseases, among other factors.

Q: #2: What are low vision aids and devices?

  • A: Low vision aids are a combination of special lenses and devices that maximize any usable vision to help patients read, recognize faces, watch TV, and carry out daily tasks. Common low vision aids include low vision glasses like telescopes, microscopes, prisms, filters, electronic visual aids and optical magnifiers. Your low vision eye doctor will work with you to prescribe the most effective devices for your needs.


Why Do Seniors Often Overestimate How Well They Can See?

woman drinking coffee 640

Many eye conditions and diseases often creep up slowly, with no discernible symptoms in their early stages. That’s why many people with sight-threatening eye diseases are completely unaware of their condition until they reach irreversible vision loss. This is especially true of those 60 years and older, known to be at higher risk for developing these conditions.

A Swedish study that included 1,200 seventy-year-olds, 6 out of 10 didn’t realize that their vision was subpar. Nor did they know that there were ways to maximize their remaining vision with certain glasses or a stronger lens prescription.

The study concluded that many seniors tend to believe that their eye health is better than it actually is, largely because (as mentioned above) the symptoms of eye disease often go unnoticed until its more advanced stages.

Conditions That Slowly Impair Vision

Below are some common causes of vision impairment that don’t always show the warning signs early on. If you or a loved one has any of the following symptoms, contact Low Vision of New Jersey to promptly schedule an eye exam.

Cataracts

When the eye’s natural lens becomes cloudy, it’s likely due to cataracts—a natural part of the aging process. The majority of cataract cases occur in people over the age of 50. Depending on the location and severity of the cataract, it can interfere with vision and may need to be surgically removed.

Cataract symptoms include:

  • Blurry or dim vision
  • Faded colors
  • Difficulty seeing at night
  • Seeing halos around lights
  • Frequent changes in lens prescription
  • Sensitivity to light

Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

AMD is an eye disease that affects the macula (the central portion of the retina), causing central vision loss. A healthy macula enables us to read, watch TV, recognize faces and see fine details.

Symptoms of AMD include:

  • Blurred vision
  • Seeing straight lines as distorted or wavy
  • Difficulty reading
  • Oversensitivity to glare
  • Needing bright light to perform close work

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that damage the optic nerve. It typically affects both eyes and can lead to peripheral vision loss, known as ‘Tunnel Vision.’ Left untreated, glaucoma can eventually cause total blindness.

The early stages of glaucoma do not have any obvious signs, which is why frequent eye exams are essential. Symptoms of middle-to-late stage glaucoma include:

  • Blurred vision
  • Eye pain
  • Red eyes
  • Headache
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Reduced peripheral vision
  • Seeing rings around lights
  • Sensitivity to light

Diabetic Retinopathy (DR)

DR is a complication of type 1 and 2 diabetes that damages the blood vessels in the retina. The longer a person has diabetes, the higher their risk of developing diabetic retinopathy. Controlling your blood sugar helps minimize eye damage.

Symptoms of DR include:

  • Deteriorating vision
  • Impaired color vision
  • Dark areas in your visual field
  • Blurred vision
  • Sudden increase in floaters

How Our Low Vision Optometrist Can Help

Here’s the bottom line: many eye diseases develop gradually, waving no red flags until the eye is irreversibly damaged. That’s why comprehensive annual eye exams are so crucial for those 60 years and up, even if they believe their eyes to be in perfect health.

We at Low Vision of New Jersey use the latest diagnostic technology to ensure the most accurate examination and diagnosis. If any signs of eye disease are detected, please don’t lose hope. We can help.

Low Vision of New Jersey offers a variety of low vision aids and devices that help maximize your vision, so that you can continue living your life to the fullest.

Vision impairment shouldn’t have to stop you from doing the things you love. To schedule your low vision consultation, call us today.

Low Vision of New Jersey serves patients from The State of New Jersey, The Greater Philadelphia Area, North Howell, and Philadelphia, all throughout New Jersey.

Q&A

Q: #1: What are low vision aids?

  • A: They are a combination of special lenses and devices that maximize any usable vision in order to help those with reduced vision read, watch TV, recognize faces, and carry out daily tasks. These include low vision glasses, like telescopes, microscopes, prisms, and filters. Other visual help includes electronic visual aids and optical magnifiers. Your low vision optometrist will work with you and prescribe the best devices for you.

Q: #2: What can cause low vision?

  • A: People with low vision have visual impairments that cannot be successfully corrected using traditional eye correction methods, like surgery, standard glasses and contact lenses. Low vision can be caused by an eye injury, eye diseases like macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, aging, certain accidents, among other factors.


How High Tech Helps Those With Low Vision

high tech senior 640

We’ve come a long way since 1270, when Marco Polo discovered elderly Chinese people using magnifying glasses to read.

Technology for people with low vision has changed dramatically—even in the last few years! Today, people with low vision have unprecedented access to cutting-edge medical procedures as well as a wide range of low vision devices and aids, including high-tech headsets and mobile phone apps that help them to read, navigate the world around them, and recognize faces.

If you or someone you love is living with low vision, contact Dr. Rummel to discover which low vision devices or low vision glasses will help you live more independently.

Low Vision Electronic Devices

There are a number of low-vision devices and low vision glasses that may help you make the most of your remaining vision.

Macular degeneration causes people to lose central vision when the center of the eye’s retina (the macula) degenerates with age. While macular degeneration is considered incurable, a system using VR goggles and software to magnify the field of vision are sometimes the best way to help those with macular degeneration maximize the use of their remaining vision.

This headset system can help restore the user’s ability to watch TV, read, and do other everyday activities.

Other new assistive technologies include video magnifiers, desktop closed-circuit TV (CCTV) systems, and screen readers. These all allow people to have an up-close view of screens that their vision cannot provide, allowing them to see images and texts more clearly.

Low Vision Apps

Tablets and smartphones now have built-in capabilities for people with low vision, such as:

  • High-definition screens that improve visual clarity
  • Camera lenses that capture and magnify images
  • Speakers that convey directions and words
  • Microprocessors for assistive mobile applications
  • GPS receivers for location-awareness and navigation

Moreover, artificial intelligence can now vocalize written words and sentences so that you understand what you’re seeing—no matter how limited your vision may be.

Low-Vision Assistant Options Keep Growing

There are countless new technologies that can help people live better lives with low vision. However, determining which assistive technologies can best address your needs may feel overwhelming. Low Vision of New Jersey will be happy to help by matching you with the latest and more suitable low vision device so you can live your best life.

Low Vision of New Jersey serves patients from The State of New Jersey, The Greater Philadelphia Area, North Howell, and Philadelphia, all throughout New Jersey.

Frequently Asked Questions with low vision specialist in The State of New Jersey:

Q: What is low vision?

  • A: Low vision is when a person loses sight that cannot be corrected with glasses, contact lenses, or surgery. Low vision can include poor night vision, blurry vision, and blind spots.

Q: Are there other types of low vision aids?

  • A: here are now many low vision aids that can successfully provide improvement in vision and quality of life. Popular low vision devices include:- Magnifying glasses
    – Telescopic glasses
    – Reading prisms
    – Hand magnifiers
    – Lenses that filter light